Leader Archetype #2 | The Helper

Daniel Montgomery Reality

SARAH BRAUD Contributor & CEO Braud Creative The Character of a Two By nature, the Two Archetype of a leader is warm, nonjudgmental, giving and kind. Beatrice Chestnut, a leadership expert, offers seven characteristics that define the Helper’s style of leadership — each one containing positives and the potential for negative when found in overabundance: Charm and warmth, empathy and emotional sensitivity. There is no better example of an unhealthy Two Leader than a stereotypical, overbearing mother. Other names for Two’s are The Servant or the Hostess. The mother in the television show Everybody loves Raymond or Howard’s mother, Mrs. Horowitz, from Big Bang Theory. These types of leaders want to be needed. They live to serve. While outwardly the service looks like generosity, the darker shadow is the part that requires something unspoken in return. It’s no accident that we don’t ever see Mrs. Horowitz in the show as …

Of Prophets and Profits | Part 2

Daniel Montgomery Reality

DANIEL MONTGOMERY Founder & CEO Leadership Reality This is the second in a series of 4 blog posts on what the Church and the business world can learn from one another about leadership. You can read the first post on action and reflection here. Did you know that 42% of the people who make customer service requests on social media expect a company to respond within one hour of contact? Anything more than that, and a brand will begin to see sharp drop-offs in both CSAT and NPS. That may not seem so bad at first, but if you’re a decent-sized organization playing in several different markets, it’s enough to keep your digital team up a night… literally. The Distance Between Patience and Urgency This is just one of the many ways in which our increasingly connected digital world has injected a heightened level of urgency into the marketplace. But …

Of Prophets and Profits | Part 1

Daniel Montgomery Reality

DANIEL MONTGOMERY Founder & CEO Leadership Reality This is the first in a series of 4 blog posts on what the Church and the business world can learn about from one another about leadership. When the Church Father Tertullian (c. 155-240 A.D.) asked, “what has Athens to do with Jerusalem,” he already had an answer in mind: not much. As far as Tertullian was concerned, speculative philosophy had very little—if anything—to say to the Church. In our day, I’ve noticed a similar tension between the Church and the business world: What has New York City to do with Jerusalem? With Tertullian, many would answer that question in the negative. “Not much,” they say as they seek to build a firewall between the “sacred” and the “secular.” Business lives out in that scary place called the world; surely, there’s nothing for us to learn out there. Business owners—Christian or not—believe the …

Leader Archetype #1 | The Reformer

Daniel Montgomery Reality

SARAH BRAUD Contributor & CEO Braud Creative Leadership Style of a One One of the best examples from television of a Leadership Archetype #1 is that of Lady Isobel Crawley from Downton Abbey. Lady Crawley maintains a deep commitment to her values, rights the wrongs around her, and expects others to hold to the same standards she has set for herself. Unfortunately for her, not everyone plays by the same rules. In fact, though she is a true advocate for the downcast, she can also be insufferable to those around her, particularly her frenemy, the Dowager Countess, Lady Violet.  Lady Violet Grantham calls out Lady Crawley’s idealism when she asks her, “Does it ever get cold on the moral high ground?”  Being right, righteous, values-driven, morally upright, above reproach, and maintaining the highest integrity are all descriptors of this archetype. (No one has really ever accused me of any of these …

Where Are You Right Now? 7 Signs of the Unaware Leader

Daniel Montgomery Reality

DANIEL MONTGOMERY Founder & CEO Leadership Reality As I shared last time, self-awareness is the key to high performance. Tasha Eurich—an organizational psychologist and New York Times best-selling author—has a lot to say about that in her book, Insight: Why We’re Not as Self-Aware as we Think. Referring to self-awareness as the “meta-skill of the 21st century,” Eurich writes: “[T]he qualities most critical for success in today’s world—things like emotional intelligence, empathy, influence, persuasion, communication, and collaboration—all stem from self-awareness. To put it another way, if we’re not self-aware, it’s almost impossible to master the skills that make us stronger team players, superior leaders, and better relationship builders—at work and beyond.” For me, Eurich’s most startling research finding was just how oblivious we are to our obliviousness. 95% of people think they’re self-aware, yet only 10-15% actually are. “For most people, it’s easier to choose self-delusion,” she says, “over the …

leadership development

Who Are You and What Are You Doing Here?

Daniel Montgomery Reality

DANIEL MONTGOMERY Founder & CEO Leadership Reality A friend once told me a parable that went something like this: About 2000 years ago, a Rabbi ambled along the way, paying more attention to the little plumes of dust kicked up by his feet than to where he was going.  When the Rabbi meandered a touch too close to the provincial governor’s estate, a soldier appeared, clad in armor with a sword on his hip.  “Who are you and what are you doing here?” The Rabbi stopped and looked up. “What did you say?” “Who are you and what are you doing here?” The Rabbi pondered deeply for a moment. “Son, I don’t know what they’re paying you, but I’ll give you double to come stand by my tent and ask me those two questions every morning.” Who are you and what are you doing here? Since stepping down as the …

leadership development

The One Thing Leaders Miss

Daniel Montgomery Reality

DANIEL MONTGOMERY Founder & CEO Leadership Reality Have you ever watched a singer go down in flames on American Idol? How does that happen? How do these poor people make it all the way to the TV screen entirely unaware of their glaring lack of vocal talent? Did no one ever tell them? I’ve had a similar feeling as I’ve consulted with companies.  Don’t get me wrong; I’m not talking about professional competence. The people I’ve met and worked with are some of the most brilliant operators you’ll ever meet. Unlike those contestants on Idol, they consistently demonstrate why they belong in the spotlight. But, just like those early washouts, these leaders walk out onto that stage with a paper-thin sense of who they are and why that matters to the audience before them. For all their operational brilliance, they’re completely unaware. Typical Examples In working with businesses, I’ve met …